A Revolutionary People at War   2 comments

Royster
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Dreams from the LORD 2003-2006
21 July 2005
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A Revolutionary People at War: The Continental Army and American Character
By Charles Royster
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“Prologue: The Call To War, 1775-1783”:
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Page 5: “Many revolutionaries believed that God had chosen America to preserve and to exemplify self-government for the world. The revolutionary generation had to fulfill God’s purpose against the attacks of men who, they thought, knowingly strove to sap or smash self-government everywhere. History was full of tyrants who ruled because they alone were strong or because the people had decided to share the rulers’ corruption by selling themselves into slavery. Seen in this light, the British attack was no surprise, just as America’s freedom was no accident. Britain sought to subjugate America partly out of envy of America’s strength, prosperity, and liberty. Britain and America were like Cain and Abel, but Americans would defend themselves. Having been chosen by God to show how self-government enabled a people to flourish–and holding this promise in trust for the world–what could Americans expect but assault? In the New Jersey Journal, ‘A Soldier’ said, ‘We ought to rejoice that the ALMIGHTY Governor of the Universe hath given us a station so honourable, and planted us the guardians of liberty, while the greatest part of mankind rise and fall undistinguished as bubbles on the common stream.'”
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The Bullet Proof President
Freedom to Bear Arms
Let the Readers Decide
Regulation Migration:  Gun Companies Continue to Move Operations to Southern States
A Dream about Donald Trump
Shays’ Rebellion
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“Life without war is impossible either in nature or in grace. The basis of physical, mental, moral, and spiritual life is antagonism. This is the open fact of life.”
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–Oswald Chambers
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2 responses to “A Revolutionary People at War

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  1. Pingback: Eagles over America | The Road

  2. The Americans who protested against British encroachments on colonial liberties wanted to preserve their traditional rights. They were not revolutionaries seeking the radical restructuring of society… They used the word ‘innovation’ pejoratively… “no freeman should be subject to any tax to which he has not given his own consent” [-John Adams]… From the American point of view, such taxation without consent was an intolerable novelty… They protested that their ancient chartered rights were being violated… The Americans defended their traditional rights. The French revolutionaries despised French traditions and sought to make everything anew: new governing structures, new provincial boundaries, a new “religion,” a new calendar—and the guillotine awaited those who objected…

    In a certain sense, there was no American Revolution at all. There was, instead, an American War for Independence in which Americans threw off British authority in order to retain their liberties and self-government. In the 1760s, the colonies had, for the most part, been left alone in their internal affairs… [The] colonists did not seek the total transformation of society that we associate with other revolutions, such as the Industrial Revolution, the French Revolution, or the Russian Revolution. They simply wished to go on enjoying self-rule when it came to their internal matters and living as they always had for so many decades before British encroachments began. The American “revolutionaries” were conservative, in the very best sense of that word…

    When modern-day liberals justify extremely broad readings of the Constitution on the grounds that we need a “living, breathing Constitution” that “changes with the times”, they are actually recommending the very system the colonists sought to escape. The British constitution was very flexible indeed — too flexible for the colonists, who were inflexibly committed to upholding their traditional rights. The “living, breathing” British constitution was no safeguard of American liberties.

    — “THE POLITICALLY INCORRECT
    GUIDE TO AMERICAN HISTORY:
    Everything (Well, Almost Everything)
    You Know About American History Is Wrong”
    by Thomas E. Woods, Jr., Ph.d.

    (from Chapter 2:
    “AMERICA’S CONSERVATIVE REVOLUTION”)

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