Archive for the ‘Chris McCandless’ Tag

The Wild Truth by Carine McCandless   14 comments

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The Wild Truth
By Carine McCandless

I wrote this comment on Amazon.com:

It took a lot of courage to write this book. I am sure it brought back a lot of painful memories. It was well-written and I hope more people read The Wild Truth by Carine McCandless.

After reading this book, the reader gets deeper insights into why Chris McCandless chose to sever all ties with his family and wander into the wilderness of Alaska. You don’t have to survive a firefight in the jungles of Vietnam or the deserts of Iraq to suffer from trauma. You can experience trauma in your own family. Chris McCandless had had enough physical and emotional abuse for one lifetime, left family and friends behind and drifted. His life was short, but he lived life to the fullest. Chris McCandless had an undefeatable spirit.

Not all who wander are lost.

Hebrews 11: 37-38:  “. . . they wandered about in sheepskins and goatskins; being destitute, afflicted, tormented; (Of whom the world was not worthy:) they wandered in deserts, and in mountains, and in dens and caves of the earth.”

[Several years ago I was hitchhiking in western South Dakota and this lady picked me. She told me that she and her boyfriend had picked up Chris McCandless while he was hitchhiking through South Dakota in the early 1990s. She said that he went by a different name.]

Amazon.com
The Boston Globe
Carine McCandless and the Hidden Story Behind “Into the Wild”

Chris McCandless Revisited   6 comments

Chris McCandless

Dreams from the LORD 2007-2010
15 August 2010

Four days ago (11 August), I was hitchhiking in Idaho and this guy picked me up. He told me that he went to school at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia; he graduated in 1994. So I asked him about Chris McCandless (Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer) (McCandless went to school at Emory).

This guy said that he was three years behind McCandless in school. After McCandless’ body was discovered in Alaska (1992), he was in an English class (in 1993?) with a professor that had taught McCandless a few years previous. The professor had the class study some of McCandless’ papers.

This guy told the professor and the class that he thought McCandless showed a lot of hubris or suburban hubris when he tried to live in the wilderness of Alaska; he thought that McCandless was not well-prepared to live on his own. The professor and the rest of the class reacted very negatively to this guy when he used the word “hubris.” This guy ended up getting a C- in the class.

Hubris: “n. [Gk., violence] Excessive pride: ARROGANCE.”
Webster’s II New Riverside University Dictionary

Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer
Book Review:  High Plains Drifter
Into the Wild (2007) (Tragedy, Epiphany and Closure)
Chris McCandless on 20/20 (1997)
The Wild Truth by Carine McCandless (Amazon.com)
Domestic violence at the heart of ‘Into the Wild’
The Wild Truth by Carine McCandless

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I just discovered a couple of days ago that someone is trying to sell my manuscript (High Plains Drifter: A Hitchhiking Journey Across America) on Ebay.

I got a ride from Lolo, Montana to Orofino, Idaho on U.S. 12—I rode in the back of a pickup. I walked to the library in Orofino and googled “Tim Shey hitchhiker” just for the heck of it. One of the results was “Hitchhiking America/ Hiker Rage”, so I clicked-on to it. I was surprised to see that someone was trying to sell my manuscript.

I thought it was pretty funny.

High Plains Drifter typescript
An American Pilgrim:  Some Reflections on High Plains Drifter
Roots
Into the Steel
The Life of a Hobo
Hitchhiking Stories from Digihitch

Fairbanks Bus 142   2 comments

Here is a well-written account of a young man (Dave Korn) who hikes to the place where Chris McCandless lived and died in the wild of Alaska:

Fairbanks Bus 142

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A Critical Review of Into the Wild
Into the Wild (2007) (Tragedy, Epiphany and Closure)
Chris McCandless Revisited
The Wild Truth by Carine McCandless
Hitchhiking Stories from Digihitch

Into The Wild   2 comments

[14 June 2010]

Two days ago I finally finished reading Jon Krakauer’s Into The Wild. I read the first five or six chapters at a bookstore in Driggs, Idaho; I finished reading it here at the public library in Dubois, Wyoming. I liked the book a lot. Eventhough, the death of Chris McCandless was a tragedy, I believe that the two years of his life before his death were redeeming. He experienced more in two years than most people experience in a lifetime. He lived “deliberately” as Henry David Thoreau would have said.

Krakauer writes extensively on his own life and experiences. Krakauer was trying to draw a parallel between his strained relationship with his dad and Chris McCandless’ difficult relationship with Walt McCandless. When McCandless found out about his dad’s other wife and children, it seemed like he had been living a lie–maybe McCandless felt he was illegitimate: it wounded him deeply. This deep wounding partly drove him into the wild, onto the edge, the fringes of society.

The main reason McCandless hitchhiked, rode freight trains and ended up in the wilderness of Alaska was to prove to himself that he could survive on his own. Krakauer writes of his own mountain climbing experiences; he was young and he wanted to prove to himself that he could climb the mountain and survive some near-death experiences.

At first glance, I thought, how does mountain climbing compare with hitchhiking? Isn’t it much more dangerous to climb mountains than to hitchhike? At second glance, people die climbing mountains and people die hitchhiking the highways of the world. Mountain climbers explore and hitchhikers explore: they explore new geographical territory and terrain and they explore their own limits in difficult environments.

McCandless was obviously a very well-read young man. I liked the quotes of various writers at the beginning of each chapter in Into The Wild. McCandless left a deep and lasting impression on many people in his travels. Ron Franz, the old guy McCandless met in southern California, was especially touched by his life. I don’t see any evidence that McCandless had a relationship with Jesus Christ, but he did believe in God.

When a man of ninety-five dies, people say that he lived a long life and that it was time for him to go. When a young man like McCandless dies at the age of twenty-four, we say it was a tragedy that he died so young. Tragedy is in the eye of the beholder. Yes, I would rather that McCandless had survived his ordeal in the Alaskan wilderness, but he lived more in twenty-four years than some people would live in two hundred years. People have and will learn from McCandless’ life and death. It is not how long you live your life, but it is the quality of the life you lived that is important.

People will be reading and writing about McCandless’ life for years to come. I saw the film Into The Wild for the first time last summer; the cinematography is beautiful—I liked the movie a lot. The hitchhiking scenes in the movie reminded me of my own hitchhiking experiences: the people you meet on the road, sleeping in the desert, the odd jobs you get to make a little money. I may have hitchhiked more miles than McCandless, but he rode more freight trains than I ever will.

I was hitchhiking through Belle Fourche, South Dakota a couple of years ago and this lady picked me up. She told me that she and her boyfriend picked up McCandless while he was hitchhiking through South Dakota back in 1992.

I believe the Lord wanted me to read Into The Wild for a reason. There are similarities and differences between my life and McCandless’ life. I did a lot of exploratory hitchhiking back in 1986 and 1987, but since 1996, my hitchhiking has been God’s will for my life—this is my work: obeying the Lord on the road.

Genesis 47: 9: “And Jacob said unto Pharaoh, The days of my pilgrimage are an hundred and thirty years: few and evil have the days of the years of my life been, and have not attained unto the days of the years of the life of my fathers in the days of their pilgrimage.”

Jacob’s pilgrimage ended when he was one hundred and forty-seven years old (Genesis 47: 28); Chris McCandless’ pilgrimage ended when he was twenty-four; I am still a pilgrim on this earth.

“When the Stranger says: ‘What is the meaning of this city?
Do you huddle close together because you love each other?’
What will you answer? ‘We all dwell together
To make money from each other’? or ‘This is a community’?
And the Stranger will depart and return to the desert.
O my soul, be prepared for the coming of the Stranger,
Be prepared for him who knows how to ask questions.”

–T.S. Eliot

Matthew 8: 20: “And Jesus saith unto him, The foxes have holes, and the birds of the air have nests; but the Son of man hath not where to lay his head.”

Chris McCandless Revisited
A Critical Review of Into the Wild
Fairbanks Bus 142
Into the Wild (2007) (Tragedy, Epiphany and Closure)
Into the Ordinary
Into the Steel
Into the Foolishness of God
Chris McCandless on 20/20 (1997)
The Wild Truth by Carine McCandless (Amazon.com)
The Wild Truth by Carine McCandless
Krakauer + “Supertramp” + “Grizzly Man”
The Life of a Hobo

High Plains Drifter typescript   3 comments

High Plains Drifter typescript

Chris McCandless Revisited
A Book Review for High Plains Drifter
High Plains Drifter:  A Hitchhiking Journey Across America

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Writings From The Road
By Tim Shey

Three Dollars in Whitehall, Montana
A Short Hitchhiking Trip
Locusts and Wild Honey
As a Thief in the Night
The Man Christ Jesus
New Testament Circumcision
Baal-perazim
Overcome With Great Sorrow
Enmity:  True Christians versus False Christians
Samson:  A One-Man Wrecking Crew
The Hidden Streets of Babylon
Zion is My Home
A Dream About General George S. Patton
Outside the Camp
Broken Bread and Poured-out Wine
A Pleasant Memory
Wearing a Rough Garment
Back in California
Two Dreams:  A Christian Cult and a Jezebel Spirit
A Pie in the Face and a Riot in a Church
When I Came to Destroy the City
Two Emails (Intercession)
A Fast-Moving Battlefield
He Beheld the City and Wept Over It
A Fire in My Bones
A Dream About Egypt
The Last Supper
Japan Earthquake
Glorified in His Saints
Special Forces
The Second Coming
What Can’t Kill You Will Only Make You Stronger
A Parable About Lukewarm, American Christianity
Obedience:  The Bondage Breaker
Physical Sight and Spiritual Sight
You Can’t Make This Stuff Up
This is Sodom! This is Sodom!
Praying in Tongues
Solomon Islands Earthquake
The Saint Louis Crossing Independent Methodist Church
A Disciple of Christ
Deja Vu
Brian’s Dream about the United States and Africa
Walls of Jericho Revisited
Behold, I Send Unto You Prophets
Upon This Rock I Will Build My Church
Yom Kippur
A Deeper Deliverance
Enoch:  The Seventh from Adam
The Lord Will Judge the Lukewarm Church in America
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Eighteen Years in a Cuban Prison
A Vision about George Washington and America
Destroyed Them That Believed Not
War and Peace
Escaping the Gestapo
Upon Mount Zion Shall Be Deliverance
Battlefield
The U.S. Senate
My First Time in Jail for Hitchhiking
Freed from the Prison of Sin
The American Flag:  A Christian Symbol
Two Dreams:  General George Patton and Clint Eastwood
God’s Protection in Battle
A Prophetess from Minnesota
Escape from a Death Camp
The Kingdom of Heaven

(66 chapters)

A Red-Letter Day

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