Archive for the ‘Dubois’ Tag

Dubois to Lander, Wyoming   Leave a comment

This is from the blog easthackney:

First off, I want to apologize for my recent opining with regards to Montana and Wyoming. I had lots of time during today’s ride to try and understand what happened to me. Looking back over the last two months I realize that California, Oregon, and Idaho were ideal: perfect weather, beautiful scenery, outstanding riding conditions. And then everything changed. The weather turned cold, rainy, or snowy. Hills became much steeper and longer. Scenery became isolated and dreary. I guess I had not anticipated this and was unprepared. Each day became full of worries. How steep? How high? Will it snow? Will there be services? Will there be bears? And this worry seriously colored my outlook. This ride has been incredible – both the good and the bad. I’ll try to temper my complaining over the bad. That said, today’s ride was the first sunny day in probably three weeks, and it was spectacular. I’ve got photos to prove it.

The ride begins in Dubois and will take 76 miles to reach Landers, so it will be a long day. It feels good to do away with the heavy layers, ski gloves and balaclava. And it’s so nice to be out of the snow.

The first thing I notice are the red rock formations, and how incredibly expansive this land is. I feel so miniscule.

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These pix can’t possibly capture the grandeur of the landscape:

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Look how wide open it is:

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In every direction I look, I can see for at least a hundred miles – and no condos:

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At some points I feel a little uneasy, realizing how insignificant I am on my puny bike in this immense expanse. It’s a little like The Twilight Zone.

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I feel like the only living creature on the planet. There aren’t even any cars!

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Well I think you get the idea. I did run into the first transam riders I’ve seen riding east to west – two guys younger than my daughter Jade. We chatted about what our different experiences have been so far. I felt it incumbent to warn them about bears, service closures, and the frigid snow. They told me Colorado is fantastic. When we said goodbye, they referred to  me as “sir”. I like that – Sir Hackney. Rather Royal.

I ran into a hitchiker just outside Dubois, Tim Shea [Shey]. He’s probably in his early fifties and had a 75 pound backpack. It just seemed unusual to see a hitchiker out here – there aren’t even any cars! And towns, if you can call them that, are 40 miles apart. Well, Tim and I ended up leapfrogging each other all the way to Landry. He’d get a ride for 10-20 miles, then be standing roadside while I catch up and pass him. Nice guy though. A Christian, and been hitchiking for 18 years. Go figure.

There’s a lot of Indian reservations out here, Crowheart for one. I heard there was a big battle between two tribes a long time ago. I saw some young men on horseback herding cattle like in the movies. I wanted to take a photo but felt that might be inappropriate. Sorry. Just a few more photos before Landry.

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About 5 miles out of Landry, large black threatening clouds are forming on my right. Then comes the thunder. I’m pretty much gassed but I push hard to get into town before it lets loose. I make it just in time, check in to a rustic Wyoming motel, and enjoy a NY steak dinner.

On The Way To Rawlins, Wy 5/23

Posted May 26, 2015 by Tim Shey in Uncategorized

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Two Cabins in the Wind River Mountains   2 comments

2 cabins

Jeff Milton said something very interesting the last time I spoke with him. He told me that his grandfather and a friend were out hunting in the Wind River Mountains back in the 1930s. They got caught in a snowstorm. They walked in the high country for a while and came upon these two cabins.

They walked into the first cabin and the dinner table was already set–plates and everything. There was a gun hanging in a gun rack on the wall. Those two guys stayed there till the storm blew over. The two cabins were a life saver. The hunters did not die of exposure in the snowstorm.

Over the next few years, Jeff’s grandfather would go up to the exact same spot in the mountains and look for those two cabins. He never found them.

If the Lord can speak the heavens and the earth into existence, providing two cabins for a couple of hunters in a winter storm is a piece of cake. Thank you, Lord. Glory to God in the Highest!

Dubois, Wyoming
The Stranger in the Snow
A Dream About Egypt
Chance Phelps

Posted December 28, 2012 by Tim Shey in Uncategorized

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A Dream About Egypt   4 comments

ancient-egypt-nile-river

Egypt

[19 October 2011]

Yesterday I hitchhiked from Riverton to Dubois, Wyoming. Usually it takes a half a day to hitchhike from Riverton to Dubois. After I got dropped off in Kinnear, I walked around three miles and I was curious as to why it was taking me so long to get a ride.

I walked a little further and I saw this little deer–it was hung up in a barb wire fence. It looked like it tried to leap over the fence, but instead got tangled between the top two strands of barb wire. I walked down into the ditch and set down my backpack. The fawn looked very frightened as I approached. I took one hind leg and then the next hind leg and freed it up from the barb wire.

There were a few lacerations where the barb wire had punctured the skin, but there was very little loss of blood. As I freed the fawn, it began bawling because it was scared and in pain. It fell to the ground and looked up at me. The fawn then hobbled back under the fence, through the ditch, across the highway (U.S. 26) and back into the other ditch. It hobbled a little further and then hid under some bushes.

I then said to myself that obviously the Lord had delayed me because He wanted me to help free that little deer from the barb wire fence. I was to see later on that this was partly true.

Eventually I got a ride to Crowheart where I got something to eat and drink at the gas station. I then walked a number of miles–from 3 PM till just after sundown. I began to ask the Lord why I wasn’t getting any rides. It was going to get cold (probably below freezing) and I was looking for a place to camp for the night.

Maybe a half hour after sundown, a van pulled over and picked me up. It was a woman named Brenda; she had picked me up before around six months ago. Brenda drove me to Dubois.

We both agreed that there was a lot of sin in the United States and that the Lord was going to bring more judgment on this country. She gave me some Scriptures:

Nahum 1: 3: “The LORD is slow to anger, and great in power, and will not at all acquit the wicked.”

Habakkuk 1: 1-4: “The burden which Habakkuk the prophet did see. O LORD, how long shall I cry, and thou wilt not hear! even cry out unto thee of violence, and thou wilt not save! Why dost thou shew me iniquity, and cause me to behold grievance? for spoiling and violence are before me: and there are that raise up strife and contention. Therefore the law is slacked, and judgment doth never go forth: for the wicked doth compass about the righteous; therefore wrong judgment proceedeth.”

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Brenda’s Dream About Egypt

Brenda took me to her place in Dubois and made me some supper. She then told me a dream she had over fifteen years ago. The dream was about Egypt.

In Brenda’s dream, she saw the River Nile and it was very turbulent. Then Joseph (the son of Jacob, Book of Genesis) came out of the River Nile dressed like an Egyptian. Joseph presented Brenda a little baby in his arms–it was wrapped in some sort of wrapping. Joseph then unwrapped the baby. The left side of the baby was crippled–the baby’s left arm and left leg were swinging around and around–it was very mechanical–it was not normal. The right side of the baby was normal. That was the dream.

I told Brenda that the baby was the new nation of Egypt that would be birthed from the turbulent Arab Spring. Joseph (in the dream) means that Israel or spiritual Israel (Judaeo-Christianity) will help birth the new nation of Egypt. Joseph was the savior of ancient Egypt and Joseph (Judaeo-Christianity) will be the savior of present-day Egypt. The left wing of Egypt would cause a lot of trouble, but the right wing of Egypt would be stable. (If anybody out there would like to give their thoughts on what this dream means, please leave a comment below)

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I told Brenda that the Lord delayed me so that she could pick me up, give me those Scriptures and tell me her dream about Egypt. After we watched this video about the modern discovery of Mount Sinai in Saudi Arabia, Brenda drove me to the Episcopal Church where I slept on the floor last night.

Brenda’s ride to Dubois was very Providential. More severe judgment from the Lord may be coming soon on the United States. So be it.

Egypt is Burning
Israel, Iraq and Egypt
Islam is Slavery
Bereshith
Arab Spring Run Amok:  ‘Brotherhood’ Starts Crucifixions
Western Desert Journey, Egypt
Obama Regime Seething Over Egypt-Israeli Cooperation
The Day We Egyptians Lost Our Moment
How Egypt’s Revolution Fell Apart
Out of Egypt
The Nile River Valley
Egypt Unites Against ISIS
Farewell to the Pharaoh
Egypt said to be on the verge of civil war
Egyptian President Sisi makes history building largest church in the Mideast

Dubois, Wyoming   3 comments

Bighorn rams, Whiskey Mountain, near Dubois, Wyoming.

Bighorn rams, Whiskey Mountain, near Dubois, Wyoming

[8 June 2010]

I got dropped off here in Dubois, Wyoming earlier this afternoon. I will spend some time here at the library typing some things up and then camp out by the river tonight. God willing, I will head to Riverton tomorrow.

This is a popular saying in Wyoming: “There are two seasons in Wyoming: winter and road construction.”

There was some road construction as I walked north out of Jackson this morning. Looks like there will be road construction on U.S. 26 between Moran Junction and Dubois later this month. Without road construction we will be a people no more. Road construction is the basis of a sound economy–transportation of goods and national defense. The Romans built roads all over their empire. At one time, all roads led to Rome. Later, all roads led to London. Now, all roads lead to Dubois, Wyoming.

Road construction is eternal.

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Luke 9: 58: “And Jesus said unto him, Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nests; but the Son of man hath not where to lay his head.”

“The Son of man hath not where to lay his head.”

Sounds like the Son of man had no certain dwelling place. Reminds me of someone I know very well.

If I have money, I will get a motel room. I made some money working for some friends out west, so a motel room is well within my grasp–till the money runs out.

I have slept in abandoned cars, barns, hay stacks, corn stacks, under bridges, homes under construction, homes under slow deconstruction (abandoned), fields, pastures, city parks and what have you. The Lord helps me find places to sleep: “The earth is the Lord’s and the fullness thereof.”

I have slept in post offices and in a couple of truck stops. I also have a two-man tent that I use whenever I can. I have stayed in missions and shelters and slept under trees. A hitchhiker has to get his sleep somehow.

I once slept in a pickup near these railroad tracks in a small town in Nebraska. I woke up and walked to U.S. 30 and started thumbing for a ride. A half hour later, some guy walked up to the pickup and drove off with it. I am glad that I didn’t sleep in that morning.

I am sure that someday the Lord will let me settle down some place. It doesn’t really matter where–I am pretty flexible. It doesn’t matter where I lay my head . . . as long as I abide in the powerful Presence of God (Zion).

Zion is my home.

God’s Protection in Battle
Tim Shey Hitchhiking in Western Wyoming
Chance Phelps
easthackney