Archive for the ‘Harry Truman’ Tag

Israel, Iraq and Egypt   Leave a comment

middle6

In 1948 the Lord re-established the nation of Israel. The fact that President Truman was the first head of state to recognize the state of Israel was the main reason, I believe, President Truman was re-elected in 1948. Arguably, Israel is the most important nation on the planet because Israel gave us the Law, the Prophets, the New Testament and the Messiah: the Lord Jesus Christ.

In the first decade of the 21st Century, the Lord raised up President George W. Bush to take out Saddam Hussein (a Satanic stronghold) in Iraq. The Lord has done—and will continue to do—a powerful work in Iraq. Iraq is the cornerstone of the Middle East.

The Iraq War was NOT about oil, but about freedom: freedom from Islamo-Fascist Slavery. In God’s economy, oil is secondary, freedom comes first. “Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty.” But in the world’s economy, oil IS important. As long as we continue to drill for oil and gas and mine coal, we are showing the Lord that we are subduing the earth (Hebrew kabbash [subdue]–Genesis 1: 28). We could call this The Oil-Gas-Coal Kabbash. But this is a different issue and I don’t want to get on some other tangent here.

Now we come to Egypt. The Lord began the Arab Spring to get rid of Hosni Mubarak and prepare the way for democratic elections and government in Egypt. Egypt—like Iraq—at one time was one of the cradles of civilization after the Lord destroyed/judged the earth in Noah’s generation. Egypt is a great cornerstone in North Africa and maybe to the rest of Africa. As Egypt goes, so goes Africa(?).

We are now in the second decade of the 21st Century. If the first decade of the 21st Century was the decade of Iraqi beginnings, then the second decade of the 21st Century will be the decade of Egyptian beginnings.

Someone may ask, Isn’t Israel the cornerstone of the Middle East? No. Israel is the cornerstone for the Lord’s plan for the whole world. Israel is not a regional player, but a world player. Israel is an integral partner in the Israeli-British-American Military-Industrial Complex that the Lord is using to vanquish Islamo-Fascist Slavery in the world. Spiritual Judaeo-Christianity is growing stronger; Islamo-Fascist Slavery will ultimately wither on the vine.

In faith, I believe that, in the future, Israel, Iraq and Egypt will be a powerful trinity or alliance against radical Islam in the Middle East and North Africa. The Alpha and the Omega is embedded in Israel-Iraq-Egypt Bereshith (the Hebrew word bereshith means “in the beginning” or “beginnings”).

“With the jawbone of an ass I have slain a thousand men.”

Israel My Glory
A Dream About Egypt
President George W. Bush–Liberator of the Middle East
Bereshith
Islam is Slavery
A New Vantage Point:  Syria
Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs
Obama Seething Over Egypt-Israeli Military Cooperation
The American Malaise
A Nation in Sin
Israel:  The new power in Southeast Asia
Imperial History of the Middle East
June 5th–Six Day War starts 1967
The Nakedness of Noah
John Kilpatrick hears the Lord on Truman and Trump
The supernatural protection of Israel

Harry Truman, Hoboes and the Santa Fe Railroad   9 comments

Harry S Truman (1884-1972) was the 33rd president of the United States. Below is an excerpt from Plain Speaking: An Oral Biography of Harry S Truman by Merle Miller.

Pages 41-43:

[Merle Miller] Mr. President, I understand that when you were still a boy, you got a job working as timekeeper for the Santa Fe Railroad.

[President Truman] “I worked for an old fellow named Smith, L.J. Smith his name was, and he was head of the construction company that was building the double track for the Santa Fe Railroad down here from Eaton Falls to where the Missouri Pacific comes into the Santa Fe down at Sheffield.

“I was eighteen years old, and I’d just finished high school and knew I wasn’t going to get to go to West Point. So I took this job as a timekeeper. I took it to help out at home, to keep my brother, Vivian, and my sister, Mary, in school. My father was having a hard time with finances just then.

“Old man Smith had three camps, and there were about a hundred hoboes in each camp, and I got very well acquainted with them. My job was to keep tabs on them, to keep track of how much time they put in, and then I’d write out their paychecks for them. I’d usually write those checks in a saloon called Pogunpo’s or in old man Schmidt’s saloon in Sheffield. I used to sit there and pay off those hoboes. And they weren’t bad fellows. They’d work for two weeks. They’d get discounted if they drew their checks before that time. So they’d work two weeks, and then they’d spend all their money for whiskey in the saloon and come back to work the next Monday morning. I’d pay them off on Saturday night.

“But they weren’t bad fellows. Not in any way. Most of them had backgrounds that caused them to be hoboes. Either they’d had family troubles or they’d been in jail for some damn fool thing that wasn’t a penitentiary offense. But they weren’t bad citizens at all. I remember one time I told the old man that ran the saloon, he was an old Dutchman and wore whiskers, I told him, I said, ‘This old bastard is the blacksmith out there on the railroad, and we need him. So try to cut out on his whiskey.'”

“Well, damn old Schmidt went out and told this blacksmith what I’d said, and I never got a better cussing in my life than I did for interfering with the freedom of an American citizen. And he was right. And that taught me something.

“But after that I guess the blacksmith was grateful for it because he took a file, a regular ordinary file about that long and made a butcher knife out of it and tempered it so that the edge would never come off. He made two of them for me, and I think one of them is still around the house somewhere. . . . So he didn’t hold it against me that I was trying to keep him from getting drunk.”

[Miller] When you said camps, what were they, houses or tents?

[Truman] “Tents mostly. There were tents, and I had a tricycle car on the railroad that I went up and down on. I had to make a list of the men that were working every morning at seven thirty, and then I had to go back at one thirty in the afternoon to be sure that they were still there. So when the time came for their being paid, I had the records. No one ever doubted the records I kept.”

[Miller] How much did those men make?

[Truman] “They made eleven dollars for two weeks’ work, and as I say, they’d get paid on Saturday, and by Monday morning most of them had drunk it all up. But it was one of the best experiences that I ever had because that was when I began to understand who the underdog was and what he thought about the people who were the high hats. They felt just like I did about them. They didn’t have any time for them. And neither did I. I always liked the underdog better than the high hats. I still do.”

[Miller] Weren’t you ever uneasy? I mean, you were a reader of books and wore glasses and, as you say, you’d been called a sissy.

[Truman] “No. No. I never had any trouble with those birds. They were just as nice as they could be, and when I left, the foreman down there in Sheffield said, ‘Harry’s all right from the navel out in every direction.’ Which when you come to think of it is just about the highest compliment I ever have been paid.

“Some of those hoboes had better educations than the president of Ha-vud University, and they weren’t stuck up about it either. The average of them was just as smart as the smartest people in the country, and they’d had experiences, and a lot of them told me about their experiences. I hope I profited from it, and I think I did. I had to quit at the end of the summer, but my goodness. That was a great experience for me.”

[Miller] I understand you learned a few cuss words that summer.

[Truman] “I did. The words some of those men knew I’d never heard before, but later when I was in the Army, there was an occasion or two when those words came in handy, and I used them.

“That experience also taught me that the lower classes so called are better than the high hats and the counterfeits, and they can be trusted more, too.

“About this counterfeit business. My Grandfather Young felt the same way. We had a church in the front yard where the cemetery is now. And the Baptists and the Methodists and all of them used it. And Grandfather Young when I was six years old, he died when I was eight, he told me that whenever the customers in any of those denominations prayed too loud in the Amen corner, you’d better go home and lock your smokehouse.

“And I found that to be true. I’ve never cared much for the loud pray-ers or for people who do that much going on about religion.”

[Originally published by Digihitch.com]

The Helena Hobo
On the Mend
Hobo Shoestring–King of the Rails
The life of a hobo

At a Cafe in Merriman, Nebraska   4 comments

Nebraska Sandhills

[3 March 2010]

Yesterday I hitchhiked from Valentine to Merriman. I phoned Steve and he drove to town and took me and his son, Will, to a local cafe for dinner. Steve and his wife Carol have a cattle ranch thirteen miles from Merriman. Their son, Brock, and their daughter, Tiffany, also work on the ranch. Steve had picked me up hitchhiking back in 2006, so I thought I would stop by and say hello.

Steve, Will and myself sat down at a table and ordered something to eat. A few minutes later, this other guy walked in and sat down with us. He looked like he was in his late 50s. His name was Chuck.

We talked about various things: ranching, hitchhiking, politics. Chuck then started talking about his experience in the Vietnam War. He was a Navy SEAL that had graduated from BUD/S (Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL) Training in 1972. Chuck talked at length about some of his firefights in the jungles of Southeast Asia. He said that the average life expectancy of a lieutenant in Vietnam was eleven minutes. Chuck was once shot out of a tree by an RPG (rocket-propelled grenade); he was providing covering fire for his team when the explosion of the grenade knocked him out of the tree. He had intense, penetrating eyes; it looked like he had been to hell and back.

I asked Chuck if he had seen the film We Were Soldiers and if it was a realistic account of combat in Vietnam. He said that he had seen the film and that it was very realistic. Chuck said that he had met Hal Moore (the author of the book We Were Soldiers) and thought that he was the best officer in Vietnam. I believe Moore had retired as a general in the U.S. Army.

Chuck had a son who fought recently in Afghanistan. He was an Airborne Ranger. Chuck talked a little about his son’s combat experiences on the border of Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Some people think that the Navy SEALs are the best elite warriors in the world and some people think that the British SAS are the best. I asked Chuck if he had ever met any British SAS; he said that he had met a few. I could tell that Chuck knew where I was going with this: are the SAS the best warriors in the world? Chuck told me that the Israeli Special Forces were “deadly”; he had absolute respect for them and for Mossad (Israeli Intelligence). He said that the Israeli Special Forces were the best elite soldiers on the planet.

We finished our dinner and I shook Chuck’s hand. It was a great honor to talk with a U.S. Navy SEAL.

I remember watching a documentary on President Harry Truman. Since a child, Truman had to wear glasses—he was pretty much blind without them. In a World War I photo of Captain Harry Truman, he had his glasses off. The commentator of the documentary said that Harry Truman had eyes of steel. Chuck, the Vietnam Veteran, had eyes of steel.

I stayed overnight at Steve and Carol’s ranch. Steve, Carol, Tiffany and myself had excellent fellowship at the supper table. Tiffany was hoping to get into a Christian college in North Carolina. I told them a number of my stories of hitchhiking around the United States. They have a beautiful ranch in the Sandhills of Nebraska. I was grateful to have met Steve’s family. I also met Steve’s dad and step-mom. Steve’s dad writes for three newspapers in Nebraska and one in South Dakota. Steve’s dad gave me a copy of a booklet that he had published; these were newspaper articles that were published during the previous year.

Right now I am in Chadron. I may be heading south to Alliance tomorrow.

A Ride in Nebraska in 2006 or What Goes Around Comes Around
A Conversation with a World War II U.S. Navy Frogman
No Jump Tonight!
A Conversation with a Vietnam Veteran
When Gibson Stays on Script
On the Mend
It’s a Small World
Where Have all the Warriors Gone?