Archive for the ‘Media’ Tag

The Lord Will Judge the Media   8 comments

Media Research Center sticker 2010

Dreams from the LORD 2011-2015
30 September 2015

In the past month or two, I had a dream where I saw the words “The Lord will judge the media.”*

Barack Obama and the Media
Huffington Post published names and faces of those who oppose Germany’s acceptance of migrants
Jackson, Wyoming: Modern Day Baal Worship
Jeremiah 50: 11-1
The MSM is More Guilty than Putin
That’s Hysterical
God is Dealing with the News Medias (Mark Taylor)
Mark Taylor Trump Prophecies:  At Least 2 News Media Outlets will be Destroyed
Eagles on the White House
The Abolition of Truth with Melanie Phillips
Worse than Watergate scandal surfacing

*[The left-wing media cult:  ABC, CBS, NBC, CNBC, MSNBC, CNN, NPR, BBC, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Huffington Post, etc.]

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An Ominous Taste Of What Might Be Ahead   4 comments

Fire

Little Horsethief Fire in Jackson, Wyoming, 2012

In the past ten days, I hitchhiked from northern California through eastern Oregon, eastern Washington, western Montana and then through eastern Idaho.  Today I hitchhiked from Idaho Falls and ended up in Jackson, Wyoming.  I was at my friends’ place in Jackson and noticed a copy of the Jackson Hole Daily newspaper in their kitchen.  I read the first two paragraphs of this front page story and thought it was very prophetic:

Jackson Hole Daily
March 23, 2015

Fire is small, season is early
By Mark Huffman

“A brushfire Sunday was small enough to be called minor, but early enough in the season to be an ominous taste of what might be ahead.

“With Jackson Hole coming out of a warm and dry winter, the fire burned dead grass and seared sagebrush and leafless aspens at a construction site on NW Ridge Road, in the Skyline Ranch subdivision.  During many winters the area would have been under snow, but it’s clear now.”

Jackson, Wyoming Fire, 2012
Jacksonites, Yours is a Bloody City
Jackson, Wyoming
Jackson Hole Daily
The Eruption of Mount Pelee, St. Pierre, Martinique, 1902
Some Commentary on the Jackson, Wyoming Fire (2012)
Get Out of Jackson, Wyoming!
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Posted March 25, 2015 by Tim Shey in Uncategorized

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Algona Upper Des Moines/Kossuth County Advance Newspaper   8 comments

Algona_o

Algona Upper Des Moines Newspaper
Algona, Iowa

Back in May of 2011, I sent an email to the Algona Upper Des Moines newspaper.  In the email, I told them that I had a book published in 2008 entitled High Plains Drifter:  A Hitchhiking Journey Across America.  Since I was a native of Algona, I thought that they would want to run a story about my book and hitchhiking travels.  There was no response.

I was born and raised in Algona, Iowa.  I went to grade school, middle school (St. Joe, Iowa) and high school (Bishop Garrigan High School, 1974-1977) in Algona.  I was involved in Cub Scouts, little league baseball and 4-H in my youth.  I lived most of my first 26 years in Algona or rural Algona.

And the Algona Upper Des Moines newspaper had absolutely no interest in my book whatsoever.  I find that a bit odd.

Author/Hitchhiker
The Jerry Shey Family
St Cecelia Catholic Church, Algona, Iowa

Matthew 13: 57:  “And they were offended in him. But Jesus said unto them, A prophet is not without honour, save in his own country, and in his own house.”

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Hitchhikers Guide to Wydaho   5 comments

Teton-Valley-News-Logo

March 7, 2013

By Rachael Horne
TVN Staff

Tim Shey has spent the last 16 years hitchhiking
around the Mountain West, occasionally passing
through Teton Valley. Using his thumb to solicit
a ride, he’s ended up with a few tickets and even landed
in a Wyoming jail cell. It was only for a half hour, but
still, it drained what was left in his light wallet. But Shey
can walk along the state’s roads a little more freely as the
Cowboy State has recently tweaked a state law, making
the practice of hitchhiking legal.

Gov. Matt Mead signed the bill last week, which was
introduced by Alta, Wyo., Sen. Leland Christensen.

“It’s about reducing the weight of government on the
backs of citizens,” said Christensen.

But in Idaho, thumbing is still illegal.
Idaho code prohibits a pedestrian from
standing on a highway to solicit a ride.
Often a report of a suspicious person
appears in the Teton County Idaho
Sheriff’s log, but occasionally it’s
simply someone seeking a ride.

Sheriff Tony Liford said if someone reports a suspicious person
and it’s a hitchhiker, they’ll check to make sure there
aren’t any outstanding warrants. If there aren’t any, the
person is usually given a warning that hitchhiking is
illegal. Liford said he doesn’t remember citing anyone
for hitchhiking and many times, if the person is going
the same direction as the deputy they’ll be given a ride.
Still, the law is fine the way it is, Liford said, because it
gives his officers the discretion to check on or remove
someone if necessary.

“We’re not running around out there looking for
hitchhikers so we can hammer them,” said Liford.
“That doesn’t happen.”

And usually, most people hitchhiking in Teton Valley,
Liford said he knows who they are.

There’s one regular hitchhiker at
Broulim’s who often gets picked
up by the same people.

Liford said
if he sees the guy and he’s on his way to
Victor, he’d sometimes just gives him
a ride himself.
Liford said there are very few hitchhikers
who are transient. Plus, people
tend to get picked up here pretty quickly.

Hitchhiking has long been common
practice in both Teton County Wyoming
and Idaho for recreationalists. Skiers, hikers,
skaters and bikers on Teton Pass and Ski Hill Road
have long used the practice to get back to their cars
or a destination at the top.

Christensen said seeing so many people hitchhike
in the Tetons was part of the reason he
wanted to change the law.

“I had the opportunity to make it correct and
I had great support around the state,” he said.

What was interesting, Christensen said, was
once he brought up hitchhiking, was just how
many legislators had their own experiences
hitchhiking and many of them did it
extensively, he said.

For a state that cherishes personal freedom, Christensen
said he thinks the law was passed when hitchhiking
came into disfavor across the US. He said as far as he
could tell, there seemed to be a real push against it on a
national level because of fears people associated with it.

And hitchhiking is directly tied to freedom for Shey.

“Freedom of movement, freedom to explore,” he said.
“Freedom to find a job someplace else.”

Now that it’s legal, Christensen said it doesn’t mean
it’s always a great idea. He said people should use
great caution when giving someone a ride or asking
for a ride. Liford echoes that sentiment.

“It’s not a safe practice,” said Liford. “I wouldn’t
want people by themselves and in particular
women, to pick up just anyone. When you pull
up to the pass and see someone with skis and
a dog, you know them, it’s probably fine. But
if you get a transient and it’s their only way of
transportation.  Ehh.  It might not be a good idea.”

Q & A with Tim Shey

16-year hitchhiking veteran and
author of High Plains Drifter: A
Hitchhiking Journey Across America.
His blog can be found at
hitchhikeamerica.wordpress.com

Which state is the easiest to
get a ride?

That’s a good question. Maybe
Montana or Oregon. The friendliest
people I have ever met were
from Nebraska and Texas.

Which is the hardest?
I’m not sure. The toughest city to
hitchhike out of was Las Vegas back in 2005.
The friendliest city by far was Salt Lake City.

Any tricks that work for
getting people to pull over?
There is probably a psychology to hitchhiking.
If you are under 40, you could probably pass
for a college student: stay clean cut, shave,
wear a shirt that says University of Kansas or
something, don’t wear sunglasses, don’t chew
tobacco and then spit on the floor of the
car you are riding in (I picked this kid up
in California, when I had my pickup years
ago, he was chewing tobacco and spit on
the floor; I let him off at the next town).
Me? No tricks. I put my faith in Jesus
Christ and He protects me. I have
never carried a weapon. Many
people have told me that I was
the first hitchhiker that they had
ever picked up. Maybe the Lord
wanted me to redeem the tarnished
image of hitchhiking in the
United States.

How do you keep
from looking “suspicious”?
Just be yourself. And if you are
a criminal, you will just be your
suspicious self, get arrested and
end up in jail where you belong.

Any advice for people
looking for a ride using their thumb?
For long distance hitchhiking, have a backpack,
a sleeping bag, some clothes, maybe a tent
and some other things.

Anything else you want to add?
I have hitchhiked through the Driggs-Victor-
Jackson neighborhood many times over the
years. Met a lot of great people there. The
last time I hitchhiked through Fremont County,
Wyo. (Sept-Oct 2012), this deputy sheriff told
me that, if he saw me on the highway again, he
would take me to jail in Lander. The last time I
hitchhiked was November 1st of 2012. Maybe
my hitchhiking days are done.

Teton Valley News
Driggs, Idaho

Guided by the Thumb

Some Quotes from Range Magazine   2 comments

w churchill

Winston Churchill, 1874-1965

 

“Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery.”

–Winston Churchill

“America is like a healthy body and its resistance is threefold:  its patriotism, its morality, and its spiritual life.  If we can undermine these three areas, America will collapse from within.”

–Joseph Stalin

“The danger to America is not Barack Obama but a citizenry capable of entrusting an inexperienced man like him with the presidency.  It will be far easier to limit and undo the follies of an Obama presidency than to restore the necessary common sense and good judgment to a depraved electorate willing to have such a man for their president.  The problem is much deeper and far more serious than Mr. Obama, who is a mere symptom of what ails America.  Blaming the prince of the fools should not blind anyone to the vast confederacy of fools that made him their prince.  The Republic can survive a Barack Obama.  It is less likely to survive a multitude of fools such as those who made him their president.”

–From the newspaper Prager Zeitung, Czech Republic, April 28, 2010

“Scruffy progressive protesters locked themselves together across railroad tracks, blocked traffic and shouted profanities at police on Tuesday in a coordinated ‘West Coast Port Shutdown.’  Truckers lost wages.  Shippers lost business.  This is what the Occupy Wall Street movement calls ‘victory.'”

–Michelle Malkin

“The smaller the mind, the greater the conceit.”

–Aesop

“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people; it is an instrument for the people to restrain the government—lest it come to dominate our lives and interests.”

–Patrick Henry

[Compiled by Gail Brooks, Carrie Depaoli & Paul J. Etzler]

Range Magazine
Spring 2012

Stimulus Sermon
Some Great Quotes
A Dream about Donald Trump

Posted January 3, 2013 by Tim Shey in Uncategorized

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Jackson, Wyoming: Modern Day Baal Worship   2 comments

Here is an article about pro-abortionist Reverend Mary Erickson of the St. John’s Episcopal Church in Jackson, Wyoming.  Mary Erickson is one of the more prominent Baal Worshipers in Jackson.

Planet Jackson Hole

NEWSMAKER OF THE YEAR 2012

Wednesday, December 26, 2012

By Jake Nichols

episcopal

St. John’s Episcopal Church, Jackson, Wyoming

Hail Mary! Reverend Mary Erickson

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Faced with a perceived threat, Reverend Mary Erickson was compelled to act. As a mother of two kids, she felt immediate maternal instincts to protect impressionable children from the graphic imagery used by anti-abortionists which included militant members of Operation Save America. Her day job as an assistant priest at St. John’s Episcopal Church had given her the experience she needed to rally others, to organize the fears and aspirations of a group and direct them for good. Her vocation taught her hate is always fought best with love.
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Jackson Hole United was formed in the face of the second coming of right-to-life protesters, including Pastor Mark Holick and his church along with OSA volunteers. Intimidated by a recent State Supreme Court ruling in the pro-lifers’ favor, Town of Jackson officials allowed their special events permit with some restrictions. It was obvious someone needed to step in and step up. It was Erickson, and others, who answered the call and provided Jacksonites with a quiet leadership that brought cohesiveness to a fractured community.
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When OSA brought its repugnant revival to the town square during Elk Fest, its shock-and-awe campaign was met with civility, compassion, and love. Red-shirted proponents of fire and brimstone were calmed by the soothing ‘blue’ band of tight-knit locals who refused to let their town be hijacked. It was inconceivable that any one person or group could unite such a disparate clutch of citizens, yet here were 2,297 believers dedicated to a movement bigger than Facebook, each ready to pledge an allegiance to their kids and their community.
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And the good reverend tended her flock with grace.
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“I don’t think I anticipated it having as big an impact as it did. I think it was one of those perfect storm kind of things. The situation met the need,” Erickson says. “I like the fact that we allowed it to be what it needed to be, we agreed that it had to happen and grow organically.”
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Still, Erickson acknowledged any inclusive group was going to have its own internal strife. There would be divisiveness. There had to be. JHU is made up of pro-lifers, pro-choicers, political lefts and rights, religious followers and the secular-minded. Each JHU member brought his or her own beliefs and baggage, and that was OK as long as members remembered the golden rule. When their emotions ran raw, when fear and hatred provoked rash rhetoric, they needed to be coaxed back on the path.
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“We did have a lot of that on the Facebook side of things. [JH Weekly] was a target of that,” Erickson says. “My sense is to step in when things get ugly and remind people what we are about. It’s OK to disagree but not to get ugly. We may come from different places and backgrounds, but we should all be coming from a place of compassion and understanding. We respect our right for free speech and JH United is an open site intentionally. But we have a mission and goal. We don’t want to shut people up, we just want them to express themselves in a respectful way.”
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Erickson admitted she continues to be somewhat surprised by how quickly the group came together and how it has now grown bigger than the issue it was born of. During the wildfire that threatened Jackson, anger occasionally surfaced again, nearly unraveling the threads of community. Some JHU members took up refuge in their safe place. The recent school shooting at Sandy Hook was another example of how horrid the world can be and once again a pacificator was needed to pilot our disquiet into calmer waters. Erickson, a gifted writer, penned an eloquent piece on the JHU Facebook page.
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“I’ve had a lot of people tell me that [JHU] has continued to be a reminder for them to try to get back to that place of understanding and compassion for one another,” Erickson says. “The fact that this group has continued to grow shows the need in this world today for all of us to find a way to move back to a civil place when we are hurt or our emotions run high. If we can do that as a community then maybe we can have an effect globally.
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“I don’t think it is over, I just don’t know where it’s going. There’s too much need for it in today’s world.”
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Modern Day Baal Worship
Jackson, Wyoming
Psychologists finally acknowledge “moral injuries”
Presbyterian Church in Jackson, Wyoming
Some Commentary on the Jackson, Wyoming Fire (2012)
Defining Sin
Get Out of Jackson, Wyoming!
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Shiloh
By Tim Shey

Brutal deathdance;
My eyes weep blood.
Pharisees smile like vipers,
They laugh and mock their venom:
Blind snakes leading
The deaf and dumb multitude.

Where are my friends?
The landscape is dry and desolate.
They have stretched my shredded body
On this humiliating tree.

The hands that healed
And the feet that brought good news
They have pierced
With their fierce hatred.

The man-made whip
That opened up my back
Preaches from a proper pulpit.
They sit in comfort:
That vacant-eyed congregation.
The respected, demon-possessed reverend
Forks his tongue
Scratching itchy ears
While Cain bludgeons
Abel into silence.

My flesh in tattered pieces
Clots red and cold and sticks
To the rough-hewn timber
That props up my limp, vertical carcase
Between heaven and earth.
My life drips and puddles
Below my feet,
As I gaze down dizzily
On merciless eyes and dagger teeth.

The chapter-and-versed wolves
Jeer and taunt me.
Their sheepwool clothing
Is stained black with the furious violence
Of their heart of stone.
They worship me in lip service,
But I confess,
I never knew them
(Though they are my creation).

My tongue tastes like ashes:
It sticks to the roof of my mouth.
I am so thirsty.
This famine is too much for me.
The bulls of Bashan have bled me white.
Papa, into your hands
I commend my Spirit.

Ethos
February/March 1997
Iowa State University

Genesis 49: 10: “The scepter shall not depart from Judah, nor a lawgiver from between his feet until Shiloh come; and unto him shall the gathering of the people be.”

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The Original Enviro-Nazis
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Bill Would Legalize Hitchhiking in State   Leave a comment

logonew

By Trevor Brown
Wyoming Tribune Eagle

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CHEYENNE [19 December 2012] — Tim Shey has hitchhiked across Wyoming dozens of times.

The former Jackson resident says it’s a useful way to meet new people, share his Christian faith with fellow travelers and easily find employment.

“If you’re single and unemployed, all you have to do is throw on a backpack, hit the road, and you are bound to find work eventually,” he said. “And it’s a great way to see the country.”

But by doing so, Shey and many travelers like himself have broken the law, since hitchhiking is illegal in Wyoming.

A state lawmaker is now trying to change that by introducing legislation to legalize hitchhiking in the state.

Sen. Leland Christensen, R-Alta, is sponsoring Senate File 29, which will be considered during the upcoming legislative session that begins Jan. 8.

Christensen, who spent 20 years as a deputy with the Teton County Sheriff’s Office, said the current law is doing little good.

“In our community, here in the western part of the state, and really around the entire state, people hitchhike because they need to do it, because it’s a convenience or for economic means,” he said. “It seems like one of those laws that had some good intentions, but all it does is single out some folks n usually those new to the community n who some might not like the look of or feel of.”

He said many people are surprised to find out that Wyoming prohibits hitchhiking.

Christensen added that during his experience as a deputy, the law was rarely enforced. If it was enforced, he said it was not enforced consistently.

Sgt. Stephen Townsend, a spokesman for the Wyoming Highway Patrol, said the state has issued 21 citations for hitchhiking so far this year.

He added the Wyoming Highway Patrol has no comment, as of now, on the proposed law change.

Shey, who hitchhiked from Jackson to California a couple months ago, has written two self-published books about his hitchhiking travels.

He said Wyoming is one of only a handful of states that ban the practice.

In the more than 30 years he has been hitchhiking, he said he has only been cited once. And that one time was in Wyoming.

“I think making hitchhiking illegal in a place like Santa Monica (Calif.) makes sense because of all the traffic,” Shey said. “But Wyoming is such a sparsely populated state that there isn’t that problem.”

He added that hitchhiking is much safer than most people realize.

Christensen agreed that many people have misconceptions about hitchhiking from horror movies or urban legends.

He said hitchhiking is relatively safe for the driver and the hitchhiker.

“There seems to be a lot of people across the country who have faith in it,” he said. “Anytime you are mixing pedestrians with traffic, there will be some risk, but that goes the same today for riding a bicycle or walking.

“So there is an element of caution for both the person doing the soliciting and the person picking them up, and that’s where common sense plays into it.”

Christensen added that the state law would still prohibit people from panhandling or soliciting employment or business from vehicles on a highway.

Shey said repealing the hitchhiking ban could make the state more appealing to travelers.

He said the state is already attractive to hitchhikers who want to visit Teton Pass, Yellowstone or are just passing through on journeys east or west.

“I wouldn’t think of them as tramps,” he said. “These are tourists who will want to spend money in the state.”

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Wyoming Tribune Eagle
Hitchhiking’s Time Has Come Again
Why is Hitchhiking Illegal in Wyoming?
Hitchhiking bill passes
Tim Shey Hitchhiking in Western Wyoming
easthackney