Archive for the ‘Theology’ Tag

Theology and Educated Man   5 comments

types-of-theology1

“Much that passes for theology today is simply educated man trying to explain God through logic and reason.”

–A.W. Tozer, from Delighting in God

_____

Matthew 23: 27-28:  “ Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye are like unto whited sepulchres, which indeed appear beautiful outward, but are within full of dead men’s bones, and of all uncleanness.  Even so ye also outwardly appear righteous unto men, but within ye are full of hypocrisy and iniquity.”

John 5: 39-40:  “Search the scriptures; for in them ye think ye have eternal life: and they are they which testify of me.  And ye will not come to me, that ye might have life.

II Timothy 3: 5:  “Having a form of godliness, but denying the power thereof: from such turn away.”

Beware of Theological Aesthetes
The Idolatry of Intelligence

The Devil is a Better Theologian   3 comments

f687d7f26c673d77a7a73c600c12ab68

This is from the blog memoirandremains:

Then, from the word “theology” comes the word “theologian.” It used to mean a person who has specialized in the study of God, but it has come to mean someone who is an expert in a slice of Christianity. In many cases that slice is rather small and disassociated from the whole.

These contemporary theologians deal with doctrinal minutia. Their expertise is in the area of rethinking doctrinal positions in light of contemporary society and culture. For some reason, they believe that because society has changed so drastically, our doctrinal positions need to change accordingly. To reexamine the doctrine of the inspiration of Scripture, for example, is an exercise in futility.

By slicing and dicing doctrinal positions, we have come to a point of not knowing what we believe. Not only that, but we also need new translations of the Scripture. I am not against that at all. Every time a new translation is published, I am one of the first to purchase it.

However, a new, updated translation of the Scripture is not the answer. It is amazing that in a generation of Christians with more modern translations of the Scriptures than all the other generations put together, it is just about the weakest group of Christians we have ever seen.

It is not by reading the Scriptures in the original languages or in some contemporary version that makes us better Christians. Rather, it is getting on our knees with the Scriptures spread before us, and allowing the Spirit of God to break our hearts. Then, when we have been thoroughly broken before God Almighty, we get up off our knees, go out into the world and proclaim the glorious message of Jesus Christ, the Savior of the world.

Experts who know everything but what is essential in the spiritual life are now running our churches. What I want to know is what are they expert in? It does not seem that many of them are expert in knowing God as the Fathers knew God. They do not seem to have that overwhelming awe that was predominant in the Early Church movement.

What have our experts done for the Church except to push it into a rut, allowing the letter of the law to dominate and control while denying the power of the Holy Spirit? I fear that we may have become too apologetic with our apologetics, and in trying to please everyone we end up destroying the truth. This has created a religious class system.

All these learned doctors with their PhDs and their noses firmly pointed north have caused great strife in the Church of Jesus Christ. Don’t they know that the devil is a better theologian than all of us put together?

—A.W. Tozer

Tozer, A. W. (2012-05-17). The Dangers of a Shallow Faith: Awakening from Spiritual Lethargy (Kindle Locations 223-242). Baker Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

Beware of Theological Aesthetes
The Death of Voltaire
An Intellectual Dilemma

Beware of Theological Aesthetes   5 comments

ext

Dreams from the LORD 2011-2014
17 February 2014

Last night I had a dream where I was living in this house with three other people:  two women and one man.  The man was Wayne Teasdale.  Wayne started to act very strange; he began walking around the house with a handgun.  I believe I heard a gunshot and one of the women walked into the room where I was at and she had a bullet wound in her left shoulder.  Then I saw Wayne again walking around the house with his handgun.

I then walked to his bedroom and saw Wayne kneeling on the floor with his gun pressed against his chin—it looked like he was going to commit suicide.  I walked away and out of the house.  I walked to this library where these children were playing; it looked like the library was closed.  I then walked around the neighborhood and back to the library.  The library was now open, so I went inside.

The last scene of the dream:  I was in the library and the lady that had been shot by Wayne was crying; I noticed that she no longer had the bullet wound in her shoulder.  She told me that Wayne had shot himself.

My interpretation of the dream:

I knew a guy named Wayne Teasdale back in 1983-84; we both lived in this community near New Boston, New Hampshire.  It was a so-called Christian community run by an ex-Cistercian monk, Fr. Paul Fitzgerald.  It was called Hundred Acres Monastery; I thought it was kind of a zoo.  Wayne and his uncle, John Cosgrove, had lived there for a few years before I moved in.  While I was there, I worked for The Horse and Bird Press of Los Angeles.  I ended up living at Hundred Acres for around ten months.

Wayne was working on his doctoral dissertation in theology from Fordham University while I was living at Hundred Acres.  I would describe Wayne as someone who had deep emotional scars from childhood (I believe he spent some time in foster homes); he compensated for these scars by getting multiple college degrees to strengthen his self-esteem.  Wayne was definitely a theological aesthete.  I had read someplace that Wayne passed away several years ago.

In the dream, the main event was when Wayne started acting strange and then killed himself.  If someone asked me if Wayne was a Christian, I would probably say no.  He had lots of head knowledge—but head knowledge without Christ will kill you spiritually.  Talking with him usually was not edifying.  I believe his uncle John may have been a Christian.  Basically, Wayne killed his spiritual life because he studied too much theology and rejected Christ.  He also tried to kill the woman in the dream with his dead theology, but she survived.

I was reading this National Geographic article on Russia years ago and the writer was talking about Fyodor Dostoyevsky and Leo Tolstoy.  The writer described Dostoyevsky and Tolstoy as the last two great prophets of a dying Russian Empire.  The writer quoted Tolstoy as saying that theology is the Satanism of religion.  Satan has lots of head knowledge about the Bible and the Gospel, but he has absolutely no relationship with our heavenly Father whatsoever (reminds me of certain “Christians” that I have met over the years).

So this dream is definitely a warning against theological aesthetes, but I am a bit curious as to why I had the dream now.

A side note:  Wayne Teasdale was related to the poet Sara Teasdale.

Tolstoy and Dostoyevsky
An Open Letter to John MacArthur from A.W. Tozer
The Death of Voltaire