A Dream about Donald Trump   6 comments

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Donald Trump

Dreams from the LORD 2011-2016
25 May 2016

Last night I had a dream where I was driving this tractor-trailer.  Sitting in the cab of the truck with me was Donald Trump.  We were hauling heavy equipment.  We couldn’t find a place to park the tractor-trailer, so I drove to this lot next to this job site and parked it there.  I told Donald Trump that I had parked trucks there before.  The owner of the lot walked up to our truck and I asked him if I could park our tractor-trailer there for a short while.  He said it would be all right to park it there for a few days.

Revd John Kilpatrick: apolitical prophecy in His Presence
As regards Leaders . . . “the Lord looketh on the heart.”
Dream regarding United States election–Call to Prayer!
God and Donald Trump (Nita Johnson)
Dream:  George W. Bush and Dick Cheney
Vladimir Putin on Barack Obama

The Difference a Sojourner’s Lifestyle Makes to Settlers   4 comments

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A Stranger and a Pilgrim on the Earth

This is from the ChosenRebel’s Blog:

Today: The effect of a sojourners lifestyle on settlers

This disquiets the settler. He or she believes in Christ but still looks for fulfillment and joy in things, and experiences, and accomplishments, rather than in Christ himself—in the gifts of the Christ rather than the person of Christ. The settler often doesn’t like many of those called into the sojourner’s company. True sojourners generally do not come from “polite company,” and so they are often deemed a threat to the “security/comfort/convenience” crowd.

1 Corinthians 1:26-29
For consider your calling, brethren, that there were not many wise according to the flesh, not many mighty, not many noble; but God has chosen the foolish things of the world to shame the wise, and God has chosen the weak things of the world to shame the things which are strong, and the base things of the world and the despised God has chosen, the things that are not, so that He may nullify the things that are, so that no man may boast before God.

1 Corinthians 6:9-11
Or do you not know that the unrighteous will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived; neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor effeminate, nor homosexuals, nor thieves, nor the covetous, nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor swindlers, will inherit the kingdom of God. Such were some of you; but you were washed, but you were sanctified, but you were justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ and in the Spirit of our God.

The settler doesn’t always enjoy the company of the sojourner. They threaten his security. Their past lives frighten him and make him uncomfortable. Their tattoos and piercings and hair color and clothing and dysfunctional pasts are messy and unfamiliar. And the radical nature of their fervor for Christ, their willingness to live for anything other than comfort and security and convenience intimidates the settler’s cozy apathy. He has paid his dues. He wants a nice secure, peaceful homestead with predictable, if boring, neighbors, to live out his days.

“Why do you spend all your time with the likes of them?” he says (in his heart) but rarely out loud to the sojourner.

“I was once one of them, (and so where you if you only saw yourself rightly)” the sojourner replies, “but God has made us a happy band of travelers and promised us the riches of His presence. Come, join with us and live for the Master’s glory rather than your comforts. You won’t believe the freedom you find from the things you leave behind.[1] And your experience of His comfort will be far more secure than all that you try to build without Him.”

The sojourner knows that one day, we will all gather round His table, one family, one great people of God, united not by color or culture, nor by geography or party, not by musical preference or liturgical form, but by this one simple fact—we have been called into a sojourning family—the Bible says we are a new race, a new family of God (1 Peter 2:9). We were called into a family and a relationship we didn’t deserve by a God we didn’t love, to be a witness to a world we are sojourning through rather than settling in.

We can never forget Hebrews 11:13:

(Speaking of all the OT saints of God)
All these died in faith, without receiving the promises, but having seen them and having welcomed them from a distance, and having confessed that they were strangers and exiles on the earth.

That is our destiny—strangers and sojourners now, but promise receivers with all the saints who have gone before and who will come after.

Why is this so important? Because: Only sojourners will risk everything all the time. Settlers will risk some things some times, and that, always and only after much deliberation and calculation. And the risk that he takes will always be weighed out against the amount of security, comfort and convenience that he will have to give up.

But sojourners will risk everything wherever and whenever it is asked of them by the Master. Their treasure is not in their settlement but in heaven. The struggle therefore, is for believers in Christ to fight the temptation to slip out of a sojourner mentality and into a settler mentality. It is a struggle that most of us lose every day. But it is a war that we must wage if we are to remain faithful to the Lord of Glory.

Congregations and individual Christians, living as settlers, will never inconvenience themselves in credible, sacrificial ways for those who are unlike them (ethnic peoples and cultures) because it is too big a challenge to their security, comfort, and convenience. Denominations and churches with a settler mentality will never sacrifice their places of honor in the community to speak out prophetically because their honor might be besmirched and jeopardized if they ruffle the wrong feathers.

We Are Sojourners and Pilgrims on Earth

When the Mantle Covers   3 comments

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Elisha Plowing

This is from the blog Bulletins from Baxter:

When Elijah draped his mantle over the shoulders of Elisha, Elisha startled Elijah as much as Elijah startled Elisha!

By now Elijah might have been expected to be shockproof. He had battled victoriously with the 400 prophets of Baal and he had fled a woman’s wrath. The Juniper Tree Experience was fresh behind him. But there God had laid three unusual duties upon him. One –anoint a new king in Syria and another in Israel and “Anoint Elisha to be prophet in your place.”

When Elijah reached the farm where Elisha was plowing, he went out into the field and in a very significant but simple ceremony, he draped his old leather mantle over the shoulder of Elisha. Elisha immediately grasped the significance –he had been chosen to succeed Elijah.

What surprises God has in store for those who minister in his service. I don’t know what Elijah thought would happen there that day, but he seemed a bit surprised that his action was taken so seriously.

Elisha wanted only to go and say his goodbyes. Elijah cried, “Go back again, for what have I done to you.”

Elisha did an astounding thing: he killed the oxen he was using to plow. He boiled their flesh for food WITH THE YOKES BEING THE FIREWOOD! Then he fed the gathered people. Even Simon Peter did not burn his boat! He just left it. Elisha built immediate finality into his decision.

That’s the key to Elisha’s coming success, he made a one-hundred-percent-decision when he surrendered to God’s plans for him. It is no wonder he later received a “double portion of Elijah’s spirit.”  BL

Scribes and Prophets

Posted May 16, 2016 by Tim Shey in Uncategorized

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Darby, Montana and Estherville, Iowa   8 comments

darby_mt

Last night I camped out in Hamilton, Montana.  This morning I walked a few miles south of Hamilton and then got a ride to Darby.  I got dropped off in Darby and walked to the gas station.  I was getting too warm, so I took off my long-sleaved shirt.

As I was repacking my backpack, this guy walked out of the gas station and walked over to me.  He asked me where I was going.  I told him that I was headed toward Salmon, Idaho.  He asked me where I was from originally and I told him from Iowa.  He said that he was from Spirit Lake; I told him I was from Algona.

His name was Garrett and he went to high school in Estherville, class of 1985.  I told Garrett that I went to Garrigan High School in Algona—I finished in 1978.  We played Estherville in football every year.

I then asked Garrett if he knew Agnes Hood; I had dated Agnes once during my senior year—she went to school in Estherville.  Garrett said that he knew Agnes.  He said he remembered there were three Hood sisters and they were very beautiful.  I replied, yes, they were very beautiful.  I then asked Garrett if he knew Brian Sawyer.  Garrett knew Brian and his brother.  Brian was a cousin of Agnes’.  I first met Agnes and Brian while playing in a pickup basketball game at the Hood residence the summer before my senior year.

I then told Garrett that I once got a ride from Nebraska to Estherville [in 2002] and got dropped off at around 10 o’clock at night.  I was walking down the main street of Estherville when I noticed this car drive past, swing into this parking lot and pull up right next to me on the sidewalk.  This guy stuck his head out of the window and asked, “Are you Tim Shey?”

I replied, “Yes, I am.”  I was a bit flabbergasted.

We started talking and he had picked me up hitchhiking in Humboldt a few months ago and drove me to Algona.  He told me to get in his car and we drove to his apartment in Estherville.

In his apartment, he opened his Bible to the Book of Ezekiel.  He showed me Ezekiel 21: 27:  “I will overturn, overturn, overturn, it: and it shall be no more, until he come whose right it is; and I will give it him.”  He told me that the Lord wanted him to show me that Scripture.  He later gave me a ride to Algona.

I spoke with Garrett for a little while and then he said, “It’s a small world.”

I said, “It sure is.”

We shook hands and I walked south on U.S. 93 towards Salmon.

estherville_ia

It’s a Small World
Blaise Pascal
A Sword is Sharpened

Posted May 1, 2016 by Tim Shey in Uncategorized

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Listening to God before We Speak for Him   3 comments

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This is from the Life is Worship blog:

“Holy men of soberer and quieter times than ours knew well the power of silence. David said, I was dumb with silence, I held my peace, even from good; and my sorrow was stirred. My heart was hot within me; while I was musing the fire burned: then spake I with my tongue. There is a tip here for God’s modern prophets. The heart seldom gets hot while the mouth is open. A closed mouth before God and a silent heart are indispensable for the reception of certain kinds of truth. No man is qualified to speak who has not first listened. It might well be a wonderful revelation to some Christians if they were to get completely quiet for a short time, long enough, let us say, to get acquainted with their own souls, and to listen in the silence for the deep voice of the Eternal God. The experience, if repeated often enough, would do more to cure our ulcers than all the pills that ever rolled across a desk.”

–A.W. Tozer

 

Scribes and Prophets

HERETICS – Chapter 19: Slum Novelists and the Slums   2 comments

heretics

This is from the blog Journeys of a Windmill Fighter:

I am continuing my journey through G.K. Chesterton’s Heretics. Every election season and every time there is a public policy issue there is a renewed effort to help the poor. As Christians we are commanded and called to help the poor but we do so because each individual is created in the image of God. We actually never help the poor as an aggregate but we help the poor because they are people.

Heresy exposed: Seeing the poor as a thing to be fixed and not as people.

Summary of Chapter:

Today the world is mostly democratic or yearning for democracy, but we still do not know what that means. Just look at the U.S. election today. Everyone is talking about social justice being democracy or equality being democracy. In reality democracy is not the raising of people to greatness it is because all people are great.

Democracy is not philanthropy; it is not even altruism or social reform. Democracy is not founded on pity for the common man; democracy is founded on reverence for the common man, or, if you will, even on fear of him. It does not champion man because man is so miserable, but because man is so sublime. It does not object so much to the ordinary man being a slave as to his not being a king, for its dream is always the dream of the first Roman republic, a nation of kings.

When we lose this greatness we start worshiping demagogues. Arguably, this has happened or will happen when we chose as a leader someone who only platform is being a minority in race, gender or someone that will do something for us but does not have character.

Men trust an ordinary man because they trust themselves. But men trust a great man because they do not trust themselves. And hence the worship of great men always appears in times of weakness and cowardice; we never hear of great men until the time when all other men are small.

Once again, democracy is not a political system. That is the main problem with most people today is that is how they define democracy. Democracy is the belief that all men (people) are created equal and given rights by the Creator that no one can take away. There is no factor that creates a better class of people or a worse class of people – education will not increase this value and neither will money.

But the thing which is really required for the proper working of democracy is not merely the democratic system, or even the democratic philosophy, but the democratic emotion. The democratic emotion, like most elementary and indispensable things, is a thing difficult to describe at any time. But it is peculiarly difficult to describe it in our enlightened age, for the simple reason that it is peculiarly difficult to find it. It is a certain instinctive attitude which feels the things in which all men agree to be unspeakably important, and all the things in which they differ (such as mere brains) to be almost unspeakably unimportant. The nearest approach to it in our ordinary life would be the promptitude with which we should consider mere humanity in any circumstance of shock or death. We should say, after a somewhat disturbing discovery, “There is a dead man under the sofa.” We should not be likely to say, “There is a dead man of considerable personal refinement under the sofa.” We should say, “A woman has fallen into the water.” We should not say, “A highly educated woman has fallen into the water.” Nobody would say, “There are the remains of a clear thinker in your back garden.” Nobody would say, “Unless you hurry up and stop him, a man with a very fine ear for music will have jumped off that cliff.” But this emotion, which all of us have in connection with such things as birth and death, is to some people native and constant at all ordinary times and in all ordinary places.

Yet, we make laws against the sins of the poor while praising the rich for their misdeeds.

Everything in our age has, when carefully examined, this fundamentally undemocratic quality. In religion and morals we should admit, in the abstract, that the sins of the educated classes were as great as, or perhaps greater than, the sins of the poor and ignorant. But in practice the great difference between the mediaeval ethics and ours is that ours concentrate attention on the sins which are the sins of the ignorant, and practically deny that the sins which are the sins of the educated are sins at all. We are always talking about the sin of intemperate drinking, because it is quite obvious that the poor have it more than the rich. But we are always denying that there is any such thing as the sin of pride, because it would be quite obvious that the rich have it more than the poor. We are always ready to make a saint or prophet of the educated man who goes into cottages to give a little kindly advice to the uneducated. But the medieval idea of a saint or prophet was something quite different. The mediaeval saint or prophet was an uneducated man who walked into grand houses to give a little kindly advice to the educated. The old tyrants had enough insolence to despoil the poor, but they had not enough insolence to preach to them. It was the gentleman who oppressed the slums; but it was the slums that admonished the gentleman. And just as we are undemocratic in faith and morals, so we are, by the very nature of our attitude in such matters, undemocratic in the tone of our practical politics. It is a sufficient proof that we are not an essentially democratic state that we are always wondering what we shall do with the poor. If we were democrats, we should be wondering what the poor will do with us. With us the governing class is always saying to itself, “What laws shall we make?” In a purely democratic state it would be always saying, “What laws can we obey?”

[…]

We are undemocratic, then, in our religion, as is proved by our efforts to “raise” the poor. We are undemocratic in our government, as is proved by our innocent attempt to govern them well. But above all we are undemocratic in our literature, as is proved by the torrent of novels about the poor and serious studies of the poor which pour from our publishers every month. And the more “modern” the book is the more certain it is to be devoid of democratic sentiment. A poor man is a man who has not got much money. This may seem a simple and unnecessary description, but in the face of a great mass of modern fact and fiction, it seems very necessary indeed; most of our realists and sociologists talk about a poor man as if he were an octopus or an alligator. There is no more need to study the psychology of poverty than to study the psychology of bad temper, or the psychology of vanity, or the psychology of animal spirits. A man ought to know something of the emotions of an insulted man, not by being insulted, but simply by being a man. And he ought to know something of the emotions of a poor man, not by being poor, but simply by being a man. Therefore, in any writer who is describing poverty, my first objection to him will be that he has studied his subject.

How do we know what the poor are: studies, books, and writings. How should we know what the poor are like: because we are all men. When we see the poor not as us but as something to study we in actuality are only writing about what we see as tourists of the poor.

In short, these books are not a record of the psychology of poverty. They are a record of the psychology of wealth and culture when brought in contact with poverty. They are not a description of the state of the slums. They are only a very dark and dreadful description of the state of the slummers.

[…]

If we wish to lay a firm basis for any efforts to help the poor, we must not become realistic and see them from the outside. We must become melodramatic, and see them from the inside. The novelist must not take out his notebook and say, “I a man expert.” No; he must imitate the workman in the Adelphi play. He must slap himself on the chest and say, “I am a man.

Thoughts:

People say that money changes a man, and while this may be true it is not necessarily true. Is there a point where having an extra $20 in my pocket makes me a better person? Is there a point that I become less of a person for being in debt? The answer is no. My mind and heart make me. The battle against pride, sloth, and other sins makes me (with Christ’s help). People are people and while the sins of a group are being praised no one ever sees the virtues. Today people may march for a higher minimum wage or vote with anger to keep jobs that are being outsourced. Even if these social changes happen it will not change who they are: people.

Jesus himself had no home and his disciples in more that one occasion skimmed wheat off of fields to eat. They were poor, but they changed the world because they were men impacted by the grace of God. When we help the poor we only do it because we have been impacted by the grace of God and want to share that joy.

Posted April 21, 2016 by Tim Shey in Uncategorized

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Jesus Could Save Them From the Radiation   5 comments

mushroom-cloud-624x467

This is from the blog Dreams of Dunamis:

A dream…

The dream began with a nuclear bomb of some kind suddenly going off. The bomb was many miles away from where I, (a young female adult believer,) stood. The area was very flat, with no hills around it to hide the city from view, so I could see the mushroom cloud quite clearly. The earth shook and trembled under its force, and I had to steady myself lest I fall. This explosion was not the white fluffy mushroom ones I had seen before on television; it was black and the mushroom part was deeply red colored instead. The sky was dark, though from the time of day or night or the bomb itself, I could not tell for sure. (I sensed it was night time.) The earth roiled and changed colors like smoldering coals in a fire, first charring everything black, then suddenly blowing back to life with red hot fire, before returning to the black color once again. This red fire rippled outwards like a pebble thrown in a pond, till the end of its reach left spots of black char among the untouched ground.

Then from among this vision, came a person, walking away from the bomb blast. She was followed by others, trickling in, trying to get as far away from the blast as they could. Some dropped and died as they walked, while the survivors kept walking, wanting so very badly to get as far away from it as possible, despite knowing that for them it was probably too late and that they also would end up dead.

God’s people reacted totally different to the devastation; they had the attitude that as they were not dead yet, they would keep serving and following God till they no longer could. Those Christians whose faith was weak, succumbed to the radiation and died. Those who believed that Jesus could save them from the radiation survived with no side effects from the radiation. It was as if they were somehow immune to it.

These Christian survivors tried to witness to others, and the way these believers remained in good health was a visual reminder of a miracle that could be theirs too, if they came to Christ. There were a few who turned to Christ and were saved, (from both the radiation and from hell,) but most turned away from the good news and died, for they simply could not bring themselves to believe in such a miracle or in the God that gave it to His children.

My heart ached to see those people die without Christ.

Farther out from the blast, people were panicking, and running to the stores to buy provisions. I found myself outside a Target store, looking at the long lines of people waiting for their turn to get in. Target employees were trying to keep the people in line and orderly. Many people were buying odd stuff, like masses of paper towels, that would not be of much use to them over the long haul. You could only buy as much as you could carry, for cars and other motorized transportation was not working. Walking was the only way to get from place to place.

You could tell who were the real believers and who were not, simply by the look on their faces. Those who were believers in Jesus Christ, had positive thoughts, and this was reflected outwards towards others. There was a peace about them that stood out from all the chaos around them. Those who were not believers were in shock, and walked around as if in a daze, unable to think clearly.

I was not able to tell how the people buying the stuff payed for it, or if it was simply given away to them. You still had to wait in long lines to check out your items, but even the watches on peoples arms had stopped working, so I did not know what other kind of mechanics had been left in working condition, to charge the people.

I woke up and felt both sad and hopeful over the dream. Sad that such a thing had happened, yet hopeful having witnessed the believers being immune to the radiation. I wondered if this was a warning dream, and I wondered if it might actually happen one day. I wondered if in the future I would get another dream to confirm this one.

I then went back to sleep.

Henry Gruver in Japan, 2012
He Too, Had the Same Dream

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