Archive for the ‘Dover Beach’ Tag

Symeon the New Theologian: “guarding the heart”   Leave a comment

symeon-the-new-theologian

This is from the blog Dover Beach:

“Our holy fathers hearkened to the Lord’s words, ‘Out of the heart proceed evil thoughts, murders, adulteries, unchastity, thefts, perjuries, blasphemies; these are the things that defile a man’ (Mt. 15:19-20); and they also hearkened to Him when He enjoins us to cleanse the inside of the cup so that the outside may also be clean (cf. Mt. 23:26). Hence they abandoned all other forms of spiritual labor and concentrated wholly on this one task of guarding the heart, convinced that through this practice they would also possess every other virtue, whereas without it no virtue could be firmly established. Some of the fathers have called this practice stillness of the heart, others attentiveness, others the guarding of the heart, others watchfulness and rebuttal, and others again the investigation of the thoughts and the guarding of the intellect. But all of them alike worked the earth of their own heart, and in this way they were fed on the divine manna (cf. Ex. 16:15).”

–St. Symeon the New Theologian

John of the Cross: “as if only God and your soul were in it”   Leave a comment

john-of-the-cross

This is from the blog Dover Beach:

“Live in the world as if only God and your soul were in it; then your heart will never be made captive by any earthly thing.”

–St. John of the Cross

Cyril of Jerusalem: “Our actions have a tongue of their own”   Leave a comment

cyril-of-jerusalem

This is from the blog Dover Beach:

“Our actions have a tongue of their own; they have an eloquence of their own, even when the tongue is silent. For deeds prove the lover more than words.”

–St. Cyril of Jerusalem

Peter of Damaskos: “Then he will be a martyr”   Leave a comment

peter-of-damaskos

This is from the blog Dover Beach:

“The person who cannot endure for Christ’s sake a physical death? should at least be willing to endure death spiritually. Then he will be a martyr in that he does not submit to the demons that assail him, or to their purposes, but conquers them, as did the holy martyrs and the holy fathers. The first were bodily martyrs, the latter spiritual martyrs. By forcing oneself slightly, one defeats the enemy; through slight negligence one is filled with darkness and destroyed.”

–Saint Peter of Damaskos

Messengers and Negotiators
The Gospel of Martyrdom vs the Gospel of Success

Posted March 23, 2019 by Tim Shey in Uncategorized

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Augustine of Hippo: “The truth is like a lion”   1 comment

augustine-of-hippo

This is from the blog Dover Beach:

“The truth is like a lion; you don’t have to defend it. Let it loose; it will defend itself.”

–Saint Augustine of Hippo

Posted March 9, 2019 by Tim Shey in Uncategorized

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Makarios of Egypt: “purification and sanctification of heart”   Leave a comment

makarios-of-egypt1

This is from the blog Dover Beach:

“What is the will of God that St. Paul urges and invites each of us to attain (cf. I Thes. 4:3)? It is total cleansing from sin, freedom from the shameful passions and the acquisition of the highest virtue. In other words, it is the purification and sanctification of the heart that comes about through fully experienced and conscious participation in the perfect and divine Spirit.”

–Saint Makarios of Egypt

John Eudes: “a scourge visited upon the people”   6 comments

john-eudes

This is from the blog Dover Beach:

‘THE MOST EVIDENT MARK of God’s anger and the most terrible castigation He can inflict upon the world are manifested when He permits His people to fall into the hands of clerics’ who are priests more in name than in deed, priests who practice the cruelty of ravening wolves rather than the charity and affection of devoted shepherds.

Instead of nourishing those committed to their care, they rend and devour them brutally. Instead of leading their people to God, they drag Christian souls into hell in their train. Instead of being the salt of the earth and the light of the world, they are its innocuous poison and its murky darkness.

St. Gregory the Great says that priests and pastors will stand condemned before God as the murderers of any souls lost through neglect or silence. Tot occidimus, quot ad mortem ire tepidi et tacentes videmus. Elsewhere St. Gregory asserts that nothing more angers God than to see those whom He set aside for the correction of others, give bad example by a wicked and depraved life.’

Instead of preventing offenses against His Majesty, such priests become themselves the first to persecute Him, they lose their zeal for the salvation of souls and think only of following their own inclinations. Their affections go no farther than earthly things, they eagerly bask in the empty praises of men, using their sacred ministry to serve their ambitions, they abandon the things of God to devote themselves to the things of the world, and in their saintly calling of holiness, they spend their time in profane and worldly pursuits.

When God permits such things, it is a very positive proof that He is thoroughly angry with His people, and is visiting His most dreadful anger upon them. That is why He cries unceasingly to Christians, “Return, 0 ye revolting children . . . and I will give you pastors according to my own heart” (Jer. 3, 14-15). Thus, irregularities in the lives of priests constitute a scourge visited upon the people in consequence of sin.’

–St. John Eudes, ‘The Priest: His Dignity and Obligations’

I Should go to Dairy Queen More Often
God’s House or a Religious System
Enmity:  True Christians versus False Christians
Thought — The Two Faiths
Hog Pen Christianity